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How’s your recovery shot?

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This year’s Masters was another amazing edition of one of the world’s most-watched golf tournaments. Seeing a 21-year-old player display poise beyond his years and smash all sorts of records en route to his first major championship was inspiring. It was awesome to see great performances from some of the veteran champions, too. Watching the Masters this year reinforced for me the idea that there are parallel skills in golf and business.

One of the most important of those skills is the recovery shot. The best golfers in the world all seem to have an uncanny ability to follow up a bad shot with a really good one. That is as important in the business world as it is in championship golf.

Want a Great Culture? Communicate it

Company_Culture

“Culture” is a buzzword in corporate circles; many organizations and senior management teams talk about creating or building a culture. Globally, having a strong culture is desirable. A 2015 Deloitte survey of 3,300 executives in more than 100 countries cited “culture and engagement” as the most important issue they face. Any way you slice it, this intangible thing called “culture” is an important component in high-performing organizations and those companies that employees want to work for. The key thing to know is that culture is fundamentally about communication.

What Happens Next is What Really Matters

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Marketers and sales professionals spend a lot of time, energy and money on getting people’s attention, but what truly counts are the actions that people take once they get those messages.

My business partner and close friend, INXPO co-founder Malcolm Lotzof, likes to say that “Every business presentation, going back to the dawn of civilization, is ultimately about changing someone’s mind.” He’s right, of course. If you’re selling, I don’t know, let’s say oranges — you want your customer to buy yours, even if the guy a few stalls down has a nice-looking bushel of them too. Maybe your customer didn’t think he was ready to buy oranges. Or maybe he had his eye on your competitor’s. Either way, you need to first get that customer’s attention and deliver a message that will change his mind. What happens next in that sequence is what really matters. Let’s look at the business communication process a little closer.

Fore! What Golf Taught me about Business

golf

Golf fans like me are eagerly awaiting the start of the 2015 Masters Tournament, which is only a few weeks away. The legends of the game have all walked the fairways and greens of Augusta National, and many of them have become successful businesspeople outside of golf. That got me thinking: what lessons can golf teach us about being better at our business?

The more I thought about it, several lessons came to mind:

Lesson 1: Business, like championship golf, is a game of inches. The course that hosts the Masters each April is more than 7,400 yards long for tournament professionals, but what the galleries and TV audiences most remember are the inches that separate champions from runners-up. The inches between a birdie putt to take the lead, a miracle par to stay in contention, or an untimely bogey can mean the difference in winning a Green Jacket (traditionally given to Masters champions) or missing the cut entirely.

Keep It Real to Reach Your Audience

NewsDesk

What does it take for a person to connect with millions of people via television? It might seem like a mysterious skill that only a talented few possess, but in reality all of us have the potential to reach and engage people we can’t see.

TV personalities, especially newscasters, tend to have a charisma that makes audiences take notice. And yet, their main connection to the millions who watch them live is through a camera.

What’s the secret? It’s called telepresence. The term refers to the use of audio, video and other interactive elements to enable people to feel or appear that they’re in a location where they aren’t physically present. Telepresence is just the means for reaching audiences. Connecting with and engaging them requires other things that, fortunately, we all have within us.